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Why Going Green Can Mean Big Money For Fast-Food Chains

Cookwork Perspective: Going green can have a ripple effect:  less packaging to buy, less waste, lower garbage removal costs and an increase in customer loyalty.


Why Going Green Can Mean Big Money for Fast-Food Chains

In late 2008, a fast-food burger restaurant in Sweden received an odd complaint letter. It was from a mother of two, asking the chain to get rid of the boxes that its kids' meals were packaged in. Her children only wanted the fries and toys, she said, and she was annoyed at having to throw the boxes straight into the recycling bin. It was an unusual request with an unusual outcome. Max Burgers — Sweden's No. 1 burger chain — decided to do away with the kids'-meal boxes in all of its 75 restaurants, explaining to customers that it was reducing waste. No one complained. In fact, sales of kids' meals rose. The company had turned sustainability into a selling point.

Max didn't just get rid of its kids'-meal boxes, though. Since 2006, the chain has reassessed its entire enterprise, searching for ways to reduce its environmental footprint. It has installed energy-efficient grass roofs on 12 new restaurants and cut energy consumption by 20% company-wide. The chain buys only wind power and offsets all its carbon emissions by planting trees in Uganda. And in 2008, Max started putting CO2 labels on its menus, quantifying exactly how much carbon dioxide, from field to fryer, is emitted in making each dish. "One of the problems being a burger business is, of course, the beef," says Max's chief sustainability officer, Par Larshans, noting that the meat industry is responsible for about 18% of global greenhouse-gas emissions. By showing that its Grand de Luxe Cheese 'n' Bacon beef burger produced five times more carbon dioxide than its vegetarian burger and six times more than its fish sandwich, Max hoped to nudge customers toward a more sustainable choice.

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