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An Irish Favourite: The Drunken Mussel

 

St. Patrick’s Day will soon be upon us once more,  bringing waves of green clothing and face paint, sparkling shamrocks – and most enjoyable of all – cold beer. For those looking for an authentic and fun Irish inspired meal to accompany their celebrations, they need look no further than fresh PEI drunken mussels.

While boxty potato pancakes make for a nice breakfast and the classic bangers and mash is a filling lunch, the real delight of Irish food comes at dinner with dishes like a mussels and onion stew.

In fact, mussels make a great addition to a variety of stews and chowders. Their meaty yet delicate nature let them blend well with a variety of staple ingredients such as potatoes or other seafood, though their unmistakable flavor is always a star of the dish.


“Irish cooking is based on simple and hearty dishes,” says Linda Duncan, executive director of the Mussels Industry Council. “Fresh blue mussels are the perfect match for a night of enjoying the company of friends over traditional Irish music and pints of beer. Not only are they healthy and nutritious – packed with vitamins and low in fat – but they are also a delicious meal that’s fun to share with friends.”
 

The fresh cultured mussels of Prince Edward Island have a strong connection to Ireland, as they have been cultivated in Europe for over 800 years. Waves of Irish immigrants to Canada’s mussel farming provinces following the great potato famine created a strong cultural tie to the food and music of Ireland.

The traditional Irish song “Molly Malone” (Cockles and Mussels) is an unofficial anthem for the city of Dublin, and there’s even a statue of the titular fishmonger in the heart of the shopping district. As the song goes, her mussels were so fresh that she cried out they were “alive, alive-O!” Enjoying fresh mussels then is as steeped in Irish tradition as a pint of Guinness.

“Irish food is comfort food,” says Duncan, “and beer steamed mussels are an ideal way to really savor the traditional flavors of both Ireland and Atlantic Canada. When you taste the steamed golden mussel flesh, you’ll know you’ve found your own delicious pot of gold, worthy of any Leprechaun.”


Beyond steaming with beer, there are many ways to enjoy a drunken mussel. Various popular recipes involve cooking with white wine or pairing with champagne. Mussels with green curry or pesto are also popular dishes that add some green for St. Patrick’s Day.

 

For more mouth-watering ways to celebrate a variety of holidays and occasions, visit the Mussel Industry Council’s website (www.discovermussels.com/chef  user name:chef  password:mussels).

 

 

Cockles and Mussels or Molly Malone
Written and Composed by James Yorkston

In Dublin's fair city, where the girls are so pretty
I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone
As she wheeled her wheel-barrow
Through streets broad and narrow
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!
Alive, alive-O! alive, alive-O!
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O! 

 

She was a fish-monger, but sure 'twas no wonder
For so were her father and mother before
And they each wheeled their barrow
Through streets broad and narrow
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!
Alive, alive-O! alive, alive-O!
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!

 

She died of a fever, and no one could save her
And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone
But her ghost wheels her barrow
Through streets broad and narrow
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!
Alive, alive-O! alive, alive-O!
Crying cockles and mussels, alive, alive-O!

 

 

Related Articles: 

   Pan-Roasted Mussels in Miso Broth


   Mussels in BBQ Sauce

For more St. Patrick Day menus visit 

http://www.discovermussels.com/content/chefrecipes 

For more information visit:

 Discover Mussels Group

For more articles visit:

 6 more reasons to heart PEI Mussels

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